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Johnson College is ecstatic about two programs that are a true benefit to the adult learner.

The Advanced Manufacturing Engineering Technology program at Johnson College is designed to prepare students for the modern manufacturing environment. This program will prepare students for entry level positions within companies that have implemented team oriented design, production, quality and maintenance systems within the manufacturing environment. The technical courses provide the graduate with a solid foundation of advanced manufacturing procedures. The combination of the general education courses and technical courses equip the graduates with the communication, mathematics and problem solving skills necessary to perform in the modern workplace.

“Manufacturers are becoming increasingly dependent upon the use of high-tech equipment that involves multiple, integrated systems,” explained Cole Hastings Goldstein, director of advanced manufacturing. “It is critical that these companies be able to recruit and employ individuals who know how to operate, troubleshoot and maintain this high-tech equipment. Johnson College prides itself in collaborating with manufacturers in the region to prepare students to not only work on current equipment, but to prepare them to maintain and even create the equipment of the future.”

American manufacturers are becoming increasingly dependent upon the use of high-tech equipment that involves multiple, integrated systems. It is critical that these companies be able to recruit and employ people who know how to operate, troubleshoot and maintain this high-tech equipment.

“Manufacturing is the third largest employment sector in Northeastern Pennsylvania, so our program is preparing the people who will keep this industry functioning for years to come,” said Goldstein. “Johnson College’s facility emulates that of a modern manufacturing facility, it is clean and sleek with both traditional machining equipment as well as robots for automation, 3D printers for prototyping, and many materials for fabrication.”

The program’s goals include the skills necessary to obtain entry-level technical positions in the manufacturing environment; troubleshoot electrical, electronic and mechanical systems using theoretical principles and measured values to resolve operational issues; demonstrate the ability to communicate in a professional manner to determine the nature of a problem or to explain repairs; demonstrate the proper and safe use of hand tools, measuring equipment and test equipment used during manufacturing or troubleshooting and possess the skills necessary to correctly and safely operate machines used in the production of mechanical parts.

Johnson also offers the electronic engineering technology program, which prepares graduates as entry-level technicians. Students will become proficient in the theoretical and practical applications associated with electronic devices, instrumentation controls and systems, according to Goldstein.

Career opportunities include work as technicians and sales representatives in the field of electronic instrumentation and computer repair. Typical employers in the electronic career are machine and instrumentation manufacturers, electronic service companies, communication industries, electronic media and electronic sales.

Program goals include the ability to troubleshoot electronic circuits and systems using theoretical principles and measured values to resolve operational issues, demonstrate the ability to communicate with a customer, team member or supervisor in a professional manner to determine the nature of a problem or to explain repairs and the ability to use hand tools and test equipment in a safe manner.